An ORGANIC Life

5 09 2015

Organic growth.

So far this is how the tiny house movement has begun.

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What do you want out of life?

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Fear based. Is most of how we all live. If you want something else, MOVE – you are not a tree. 😉

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TRUST IN YOURSELF!

 

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Community.

2 09 2015

Community is love. Real community is love.

Here are some of the people in my community that I love:

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First on the list (had to do it) my GH James! Check out his blog too – http://www.the companystoreonwheels.com

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The AMAZING miss Cassie. My kindred soulmate.

I found family here. I had a dinner the other night with Kai Rostcheck and Rene’ Hardee who are doing amazing things for the tiny house movement! You both are such an inspiration!

Some other people in my THOW family community:

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My neighbor Rachel.

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Our newest THOW neighbors Marissa and Wendy.

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How lucky am I!?!!!

 

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Let it go.

23 08 2015

So many meanings to that phrase.

I first learned how to let go through my studies in Yoga, Buddhism, Hinduism and Ayurveda. I learned how to let go of unwanted thoughts and outcomes. Non-attachment, as some would call it. I found that through daily practice, it became easier and easier to let go of life’s negativity.

I also had learned that very lesson from the way I have chosen to lead my life. I have moved around and traveled more than the average person on this planet. I am used to letting go of friends, relationships, family… Even though I am very close with a lot of people; I have never been physically or locally close to loved ones for more than a short few years; at most. The longest side by side, through thick or thin, has been with my dog, Nesta; for the last six years.

I love my life. I have seen things that others have only dreamt about. I have met and come to know so many amazing human beings. There have also been many tragedies along the way; but I don’t regret a second of my journey in this life, and I plan on only continuing it and expanding it.

So lets get to it and talk about going “tiny”… I mean, that’s what you want to hear about, right?

Going “tiny”, most literally means letting go of material possessions. It also could mean giving up relationships with others that do not believe in “that type” of way of life. I am lucky to have had much support in my decision to go “tiny”. Letting go is not an easy task, and even though I have practiced it for years, it will always be an endless practice for me.

It comes in waves. At first, selling/giving away most of my material possessions was like a weight being lifted off of my shoulders. It was freeing. It still is freeing. Letting go of certain human connections has been the only hard part for me. I am lucky, because I live in a loving THOW welcoming community where I have found neighbors that are like-minded and love on each other; on the daily. Yet there are days that I also feel isolated; that it is still only myself and my dog.

I am an advocate of the tiny house community movement for exactly that reason. I did not used to value family (blood related or not), and I feel so strongly for the right for everyone to feel welcome, and to fit into their communities, no matter how they choose to live. I believe in unconditional love (no matter how “outdated that may be”).

I don’t have any fancy tiny house pictures this week, just a part of my story in choosing to go tiny. I am blessed, everyday of my life. Love yourself, love others, and allow for yourself to also be blessed.

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Lake Life

17 08 2015

Life is very exciting on a lake. Constant activity. I still pinch myself when I wake up in the morning to take my dog outside and realize all over again that I live steps from a lake. I have a million dollar view – how did I get so lucky?

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The fishing / grilling / boating / lounging dock in my community.

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Water powered jet pack on the lake!

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Kayaking!

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Neighbors out for Sunday tubing!

I love that I have a paddle board steps from my door that I can jump on anytime I want and go out onto the water. Ironically, when I was looking to go “tiny” the last place I wanted to move to was Orlando. It just didn’t make sense to me to live in Florida and not be by water. So when I came out to my community for the first time to see a tiny home (the first one I had actually seen in person and walked through) I had no intention of living here, I just thought I was coming to look at a tiny house.

The lake sold me. A tiny house and the ability to be steps from the lake? I’ll take it (and I did!).

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Tiny House Talk

13 08 2015

Recently I was featured on www.tinyhousetalk.com. A beautiful resource on the tiny house movement that is very inclusive of all types of “tiny”; including micro, tiny and small.

The site is probably best explained by the creator himself, Alex Pino. So here in his own words is why he created the site:

About Tiny House Talk:
“Hi, I’m Alex Pino. In 2007 I started to simplify because I wanted to take more control over my life, was unhappy with where I was at and wanted to do something about it.
So by 2009 I went from working as a government computer technician and living in a 1400 square foot home…
To writing about tiny houses and simple living while building my own Internet publishing business out of a 500-square-foot apartment. Since then I’ve tried living out of my backpack and explored many tiny and small homes of all kinds.
In 2009 I created Tiny House Talk and the Tiny House Newsletter because I wanted to share my passion for living smaller and being more purposeful with anyone who was also interested. And that’s still what I’m doing today. So this is a place for you to explore and share inspiring simple living stories.
From people who live in 120 sq. ft. tiny houses on wheels to those who live in 825 sq. ft. solar powered homes and just about anything else in between.
The purpose of Tiny House Talk is to spread the message of freedom, peace and happiness through simple living.

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(Andrea and Me In Front of One of Dan Louche’s Tiny Houses)

In March of 2010 I got to attend Jay Shafer’s tiny house workshop in Orlando, Florida.
This helped me gain an understanding on how to build a house, when I do it myself.

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But I couldn’t stop there. And I still wasn’t ready to tackle a build by myself, so..
In July 2011 I attended Derek “Deek” Diedricksen’s Micro Building Workshop
In July of 2011 I was invited to attend Deek’s micro building workshop.
This was another opportunity for me to learn from someone who has designed and built several micro structures.

Building Your Own Tiny House:
If you need help building, designing or getting your own tiny house built start with my free eBook, Plans to Build Your Own Tiny House.

Read more at http://tinyhousetalk.com/about/#yhAcbqsxko7oRAie.99

I have come back to his website and blog many times and will keep continuing to do so… I highly suggest that you go and check it out!





tiny time for BIG honest

5 08 2015

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I LOVE living in a THOW community. I never have had any regrets since I took the leap of moving into my THOW. I do believe though, as a THOW owner and full time resident, that there are some things that should be considered when thinking of going “THOW” tiny. These are a few things I have experienced since living in my THOW.

  1. Space Boundaries: I get along with my neighbors great! The reality is though, that there are just some people out there that for whatever reason, just may not like you; no matter how kind of a person your are. Personally, as a community resident I welcome my friends to sit on my back patio (even when I am not there), allow my next door neighbor to use my hose (since he doesn’t have a dual hook-up for his own), help put together community cookouts, etc…. Buttttt… Here are some of the downfalls… since living here I have had the water to my house (the connection is outside) shut off four times. I know it’s not my neighbor, who is the only one that uses my water connection (the hose), so it is just something I have experienced and have no idea why someone would do that. I also find garbage around my house at times. I get it, it happens, it could even be the wind blowing it by my THOW and getting caught in my landscaping, but all I know is that I pick up after myself.
  2. Hot water: This is a tricky one, so let me explain. I have a tankless water heater. Since the day I moved in it has been consistent; if it is between 6-7am or after 8pm I have perfectly endless hot water. So, theoretically, that shows me that my tankless water heater works. Yet during the rest of the day when I try to take a shower I am not getting hot water (and I mean unbearably cold!). I can’t seem to figure it out – am I not getting hot water during that period of day because it is during the time of day that the rest of the community is using hot water as well? On the other side of it, being that I have a tankless water heater, the use of water from the rest of the park shouldn’t matter! I have not addressed the issue with the park owner, park manager or my builder and have just learned to live with it thus far. It’s one of those things that cannot be possible, but it is.
  3. Privacy: As an Ayurvedic practitioner I do much of my work from home. I run my own website, do my own marketing, research/write and submit articles to publish, sell product, etc. One of the things that you give up living in a tiny home is privacy. My neighbors understand not to knock on my door (they can text me to see if I am busy) but I can’t control the people who think it is OK to knock on the door of my home (or try and peer through my windows). My largest concern with this (other than being interrupted from my work) is that I have a dog who spends a lot of time up in my loft while I am working. When someone knocks on my door she immediately bolts down the stairs (more like tumbles – only because the knocking startles her) and I am terrified because I know that at some point it is going to cause her an injury. I plan on buying a “please do not disturb” or “please check in with the front office” sign to hang by my door in the hopes that it will help. Our community open houses have helped reduce the number of random knocks, but it is definitely something I would have reconsidered had I known it would be such an issue (I suppose I thought… “I don’t just randomly go up to other peoples homes and knock on their door to ask for a tour, so why would my home be any different?”). Don’t get me wrong, I know people want tours of tiny homes (I mean I did too) – but I didn’t realize the lack of (for use of a better term) “common sense” some people would (or would not) have about it. When I originally wanted to see a tiny home for the first time, I called and scheduled it. Pictures from a community open house:11745415_884729354948246_6254847524339165229_n10462698_686088708145646_331455843421484253_n
  4. Time Management: When living by yourself in a THOW, it can be a lot of work. So that is definitely something all people should take into consideration when looking to go tiny. Since I don’t do much cooking at home and only have a mini-fridge, I have to consider the time it takes out my day (or every two days) to go out for food. Just a little example… I need to manage my days around taking care of my dog, work/bills, shopping/errands, cleaning/laundry, working out, being of service to others and trying to have a social life when I can lol.

Moral of the story?

No matter where, or how, you live – there will always be struggles. I don’t regret living in my THOW – not for a minute; but there definitely are things to consider when looking to live in one yourself.





It’s a Buddhaful day!

27 07 2015

My tiny house sign finally came in the mail! Eeeeekk!!! I am so happy with the way it turned out. I decided to name my THOW “Buddhaful Hॐme”.

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The sign came from the lovely people at http://www.oldwestsigns.com – I explained my vision to them and they completely blew me away with their quality of work.

Video putting up my new sign.

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It really is a tiny Buddhaful Hॐme‬! ❤

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Next project is to paint my front door for an added extra pop of color.

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Choosing a name for my THOW was more difficult than I had anticipated; but when I came up with the name I knew it was perfect for my home. That’s how going tiny has been happening for me from the start, just seamlessly falling into place (little bumps – lets be realistic – but overall pretty seamless), and that’s how I know I made the right decision.

Day view vs. night view.

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Simple = happiness!

And for those that noticed, the company was kind enough to redo my sign with the correct spelling.

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